8 Best Garden Rakes that Maintain Beautiful Backyard

How to choose the right garden rake?

by Emma Shaw

Although your yard may seem endlessly full of chores, if you live in an area where there are trees and seasons change, then leaves will be a constant part of your yard. This means that raking is a necessary (and often fearful) task. This job can be completed quickly with minimal strain using a quality leaf rake. You might actually need several rakes, as different types have different purposes.

However, it is not easy to find the right rake, especially for those who aren’t familiar with their thatch rake and their tines. Therefore, you need to think about the reasons you need it and choose the right one from home improvement stores as well as online retailers such as Amazon.

You don’t have to feel overwhelmed by the sheer number of rakes out there. To give you all the information you need, we did extensive research on rakes. Continue reading to find out more about rakes. This information will help to determine which product is right for you.

Best Garden Rakes

1. A.M. Leonard Narrow Shrub Rake

$48.05
Amazon.com
as of January 17, 2022 4:25 pm

Pros:
Strong built and lightweight
Wood handle can last long.
Friendly to short, older women
Narrow rake for tight areas.
Head width: 8 inches
Handle length: 54 inches

Pros:
A little tricky to assemble for some people

2. TABOR TOOLS J16A Adjustable and Foldable Telescopic Metal Rake

$29.99
Amazon.com
as of January 17, 2022 4:25 pm

Pros:
Great for light raking
Adjustable steel telescopic handle
The expandable head can be locked in any position.
Easy to storage
Head width: 8-inch to 23-inch
Handle length: 32-inch to 63-inch

Pros:
Not for heavy-duty debris, otherwise, the tines will bend.

3. Jardineer Adjustable Garden Rake

$37.99
$23.99
Amazon.com
as of January 17, 2022 4:25 pm

Pros:
Adjustable handle and expandable head for different spaces
Aluminum handle is lightweight and durable.
Head width: 7-inch to 23-inch
Handle length: 32-inch to 63-inch

Pros:
Not for heavy-duty use.
The handle is a bit flimsy.

4. Midwest 10036 Aluminum Landscape Rake

$80.70
Amazon.com
as of January 17, 2022 4:25 pm

Pros:
Best for grading
Aluminum head with round, long teeth
Heavy-duty construction
Lightweight but durable
Head width: 46-inch
Handle length: 66-inch

Pros:
Take some effort to assemble

5. AMES 2915100 Thatch Rake

$55.61
Amazon.com
as of January 17, 2022 4:25 pm

Pros:
Sturdy self-cleaning rake head
Curved tines with hardwood handle
10-inch end cushion grip for comfortable grip
Head width: 15-inch
Handle length: 54-inch

Pros:
It takes time and effort for large yards.

6. Fiskars 397940-1001 PRO Rake

$59.27
Amazon.com
as of January 17, 2022 4:25 pm

Pros:
Great for handling soil.
Aluminum handle with double-bolted connections
Head width: 17-inch
Handle length: 60-inch
Item weight: 4.5 pounds

Pros:
A bit heavy for leaves and grass, but great for gravel and dirt.

7. Corona RK 62060 Fixed Tine Shrub Rake 8-Inch Wide

$24.99
$17.71
Amazon.com
as of January 17, 2022 4:25 pm

Pros:
Strong and flexible
Anti-slip vinyl sleeve provides comfort grip.
The aluminum handle is lightweight to use.
Head width: 8-inch
Handle length: 61-inch
Item weight: 0.7 pounds

Pros:
The label is a bit annoying. Fortunately, heating the label with a hair dryer make it easy to remove.

8. Gardenite Adjustable Garden Leaf Rake

$29.95
$24.95
Amazon.com
as of January 17, 2022 4:25 pm

Pros:
Lightweight for light garden tasks
Expandable head for different areas
Anti-rust zinc-plated steel handle
Head width: 7-inch to 22-inch
Handle length: 63-inch

Pros:
A bit short for tall people.

What to Consider When Buying Leaf Rakes?

Necessity

Although the fallen leaves create a beautiful view in the backyard, it is necessary to rake them out. Because the accumulation of leaves can block sunlight from reaching the grass and other garden plants.

While a healthy lawn does not require you to collect every single leaf. Your lawn won’t be hurt by a few extra leaves. Your mower blade will shred any remaining leaves so you won’t even notice that they are there. There are many other benefits to using a garden rake in the backyard.

  • Raking leaves and grass is such an uneasy task, so you can get some outdoor exercises from it.
  • Raking dead grass and leaves over the soil or flower beds can make your grass and plants get enough sunshine and be far away from diseases.
  • Garden rakes can also be used to remove thatch and moss, level soil, mulch, and gravel, prepare flower beds and vegetable planting beds.
  • Raking will make your property look well-maintained.

Before buying the most suitable rakes for your garden, consider what tasks you would like to do in your garden. Are you looking to rake leaves, loosen soil, or level new planting beds? These answers will determine the type of rake you need.

Different Types of Rakes

There are dozens of different rake options available. Not all rakes are suitable for collecting leaves. Some are used to spread gravel in rock gardens while others prepare the soil for planting. Some are designed to clean ponds and remove snow from roofs. Depending on your project, there will likely be a rake that can speed up or simplify the task.

Lawn rakes

Lawn rakes are also called “leaf-rakes” and are used primarily for raking leaves into piles. However, you can also use them as a tool to collect other garden debris.

The tines of lawn rakes are made from metal, plastic, and bamboo. Although metal is more durable than plastic tines, it can be less effective when handling large amounts of leaves, particularly if they are wet. Bamboo leaf rake tines are more fragile than those made from metal, but they are easier on plants when you’re raking over garden beds or groundcovers.

Lawn rakes fan out into a large triangle shape. They are available in different widths, the width can be up to 30 ”. They usually have long handles that can give you an extended reach when clearing leaves.

The average lawn rake costs between $15 and $35. The most expensive models have adjustable telescopic handles and durable foldable tines.

Shrub rakes

Although shrub rakes are similar to lawn rakes in appearance, the head of a shrub rake is much narrower. These rakes can be used to remove leaves from tighter areas, such as shrubs and around fences. A shrub rake could be an excellent addition to your shed. Pay attention to the handle’s length.

Shrub rakes can cost between $15 to $35, depending on the quality and handle length. Some models with extra-long telescopic handles and durable structures may cost up to $48. Their handles can telescope in and out, which may prove useful for reaching under shrubs. There are also some rakes with foldable tines which can be folded flat for storage.

Bow rakes

Bow rakes are straight-headed with short tines that point down. Quality bow rakes’ tines are usually made from thick, heavy-duty metal, are longer and thicker than a leaf rake, and are spaced further apart.

Bow rakes can be used for more difficult tasks like spreading mulch, leveling dirt, soil, and other heavier materials than leaves. Basically, this type of rake is a workhorse–definitely something you want at your side if you have a gravel driveway or if your yard care routine includes seasonal mulching, or if you plan on doing any hardscaping projects yourself.

Most bow rakes can be purchased between $15 and $60. Some durable models are usually more expensive, up to $80. They may have clog-free features, which are specially designed with curved tines, so they are less likely to get clogged while raking.

Hand rakes

A hand rake is a shorter and smaller version of a shrub rake.
There are many types of hand rakes to choose from based on your actual needs, such as hand cultivator rakes for weeding and turning soil, hand shrub rakes for raking leaves and grass in tight corners, scoop rakes for picking up leaves.

A hand cultivator rake or claw rake is a great helper for weeding and turning the soil in small plantings and around flowers.
The short handle of the hand shrub rake allows you to control it better in tight areas.

A scoop rake is an alternative type of hand-rake that can pick up leaves already raked into piles. Hand scoop rakes are usually sold in pairs of two, one for each hand. They resemble large claws and can be used to grab large quantities of leaves or grass for filling lawn bags or garden waste bins.

You can expect to spend between $6 to $35 for a durable hand rake that will last many years.

Thatch rakes

Thatch is an organic layer between the soil surface and your lawn. If left in place, the thick layer can prevent sunlight and air from reaching the grass blades’ base, leading to lawn diseases. Removing the thick layer of thatch can improve lawn health and increase grass growth. This task is best accomplished with a good thatch rake.

A thatch rake is very useful for removing moss, dead grass, or thatch from your lawn. It has extremely shape, metal tines on both ends of its head, which are more specific than other types and are not a general-purpose rake. One side of the rake breaks up the thatch, the other removes it.

Most quality thatch rakes can cost between $30 to $80.

Dirt rakes

The dirt rake, also known as a “garden-rake”. It has a long handle and a straight solid steel head and tines. You can use it to loosen soil and break up dirt clods after turning or tilling the soil. It is often used as the final step in the preparation of garden beds for planting. A garden rake is not suitable for raking leaves, as the tines are rigid and inflexible. It is essential for flower gardeners or seasonal vegetable growers.

The price of dirt rakes can be ranging from $20 to $60.

Landscape rakes

A landscaping rake looks a lot like an overpowered garden rake. It is not designed to rake up leaves or break up dirt clods. It is used to level large areas of soil and give a precise grade to a yard.

The landscaping rake has a head that is 30- to 46 inches wide. The metal tines are at a 90-degree angle to the long, straight handle. Its head is usually made of durable and lightweight aluminum, while its handle can be made of wood or fiberglass. However, maneuvering this large rake is difficult because it has a large head. A padded grip is best for the most comfortable handling.

A landscape rake may cost from $50 to $100.

Tine material

Plastic and metal are the most popular tine materials for lawn rakes. However, there are lawn rakes that have bamboo or wood tines. Metal tines are more durable than plastic, but they can cause damage to lawns if they are raking on soft ground.

Handle material

Many rakes come with handles made of metal, plastic, or wood.

A quality hardwood handle is the best choice if you want a rake that will last a lifetime. It might even end up in your grandchild’s shed.

Quality metal handles can be very durable and lightweight, and they are made from or coated with a rust-resistant material, such as stainless steel. A metal handle can be cold in winter, if you don’t like the cold touch, wear a pair of gloves or choose a rake with a plastic or wood handle.

Plastic handles are affordable but on the weak side. They can not bear heavy-duty raking and are likely to last a short time.

Size

Rake size is not a major concern for most users. The rake size includes the handle’s length and the head size (width). The handle length is concerned about the ease of use.

There are many sizes of rakes, from small to very large. Although a larger rake will get you through your gardening chores faster, it will be heavier and more difficult to use. If you are particularly petite, you may find it difficult to use a large rake.
There are some rakes that come with adjustable-length handles or foldable tines that make it easier for people of all sizes to use them.

Comfort

When it comes to user comfort, weight is more important than size. You want a lightweight rake that is easy to carry, but not too heavy to cause fatigue. A lightweight rake is more useful if you have a larger yard than someone who has a smaller yard.

Certain rakes have padded or easy-grip handles that make them more comfortable to use. Long handles can be more comfortable as they can reduce the need to bend or stoop when you are working.

When Will You Use A Rake?

You may use a rake all seasons. But the busiest time will be autumn and winter if there are trees and falling leaves in the garden. Some people prefer to rake every week or even every day. While others may wait until the entire leaf has fallen, so they can complete the job in a day.

Another time to do this chore will be spring raking if you want to survive the lawn or plant in the backyard.
When in the summertime, a rake is very useful after you mow the lawn and trim the bushes or shrubs.

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